Went/Saw/Ate/Wrote
Articles / Ethiopian Culture / Food and drink / Travel / Travel: Ethiopia / Writing

Went/Saw/Ate/Wrote

This one’s on me. I’m happy to share my latest article for Selamta, the in-flight magazine of Ethiopian Airlines. For this assignment, I spent an afternoon being led to and fed in lesser known/much loved restaurants around Addis Ababa (one of which had one of the best ceiling art I’d ever seen, see below), all in … Continue reading

Ethiopian Culture / Ethiopian Identity / Family / Immigrant Life / Travel: Ethiopia

After Addis 2

Continuing from where I left off at the end of ‘After Addis 1‘, on the seven phases of the seven trips of this brown astronaut around the planet known as Ethiopia… Phase 1: immediately following migration, a time of feeling completely at ease with myself, it not even occurring to me to change to adapt to the norms … Continue reading

Ethiopian Culture / Ethiopian Identity / Family / Immigrant Life / Travel: Ethiopia

After Addis 1

Well, the satellite dishes were everywhere in full bloom in Addis, and I’ve learned that its impossible to be matter-of-fact not only about going to but also leaving from Ethiopia. The ‘going to’ always means something- if not to you-the-goer, then to the person who hears of it. Back in the spring and early summer, … Continue reading

Ethiopian Culture / Ethiopian Identity / Immigrant Life / Language / Travel / Travel: Ethiopia

Shock of the New

There’s this joke about an American who went to Washington D.C to teach English to new immigrants from Ethiopia. He ended up learning Amharic instead. When you can do an entire transaction at Starbucks in Amharic (granted, the store in question is right outside the arrivals gate at Dulles Airport) and even add to the … Continue reading

Ethiopian Culture / Ethiopian Identity / Family / Immigrant Life / Language / Travel: Ethiopia / Writing and Reading

How a Dam Works

Abay is not just the name of the river which springs from the heart of Ethiopia, cuts through Sudan and Egypt, and ends in the way of all rivers big and small. It is also the name by which I best knew my grandfather. Officially, he was known by the more intimidating Shaleka – chief … Continue reading